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La Sine Saloum Delta, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, its created where two rivers converge on the Atlantic Ocean, forming  a region of great biodiversity with its estuarine environment, mangrove swamps and sand islands. Due to this ecological diversity, the delta is home to a wealth of fish as well as an amazing array of birdlife which includes flamingos, pelicans, herons and egrets. There’s nothing quite like spotting some of the area’s marvellous birds, whilst looking out for dolphins and local women harvesting oysters, as you gently float along the labyrinth of waterways in a traditional pirogue – a true gift from the delta. It's truly a place to unwind with a view that's is breath taking and magical to the soul. A great spot to do kayaking and alot more soul reviving activities.


The beautiful Fathala Wildlife Reserve lies within the delta. Where  you can see many native animals that have been reintroduced to the area including zebra, rhino, giraffe and the giant eland.

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Oysters, a popular delicacy in the Gambia, grow wild in the country’s delicate and scenic mangroves (located in places where seas and rivers mix). Mangroves are among the most productive and biologically complex ecosystems on earth, but they are also in grave danger from development, deforestation, salt-panning, pollution and over-exploitation. In a mangrove forest, an oyster takes 6 months to grow, attaching itself to the mangrove root system.

Oyster harvesters in The Gambia gather the oysters from the mangrove roots using rudimentary tools. Often, these women cannot swim and therefore they their lives in small locally-crafted canoes in order to bring in a few dalasis a day for their families. Oyster beds are also sharp and dangerous; a risky place for a person without proper shoes or gloves. After carefully gathering the oysters, the women traditionally steam (or grill them), remove their shells, and then sell them at the market and to individuals, hotels and restaurants. The shells are often burned to white powder which is then locally use as white paint for painting houses.

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One  might want to know what is the best time of year  to catch a sunset in the Gambia.  Fortunately,  sunsets happen the whole year round  so no matter what time of year you go, you’ll be able to witness one.

If you’re looking for that beautiful, African red sunset, then you may want to visit between the wet and dry seasons as this tiny beautiful country lies on the  equatorial region.  During these seasons, the sky has enough cloud cover to create a stunning palette of colors and wispy swirls. This can make for a breathtaking sight.

The Gambia so small yet so beautiful is sorrounded by Senegal on all sides except on the Atlantic ocean. It offers a  life changing experience and a true visual of what Africa has to offer in a sunset.

Situated in West Africa, and nicked name the smiling coast of Africa is  the home of  incredible birds and wildlife, it vast wilderness is second to none. The bright orange horizon, casts silhouettes of wildlife as the waves of heat blends with that of the coast melt the colours of the sky right before your eyes. It creates a deep resonance of heart that will get you to feel  the  serenity of nature that surrounds you.

 

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Watching dolphins in the smiling coast  is undoubtedly one of the  most exciting wildlife experience. There're two common species of dolphin that are frequently sighted in the Gambia. They are  the Atlantic hump backed dolphin  and the bottlenose dolphin.

These species are mostlyseen off the coast, particularly in the Island  of Jinack and the Niumi National Park. The bottlenose dolphin is also known to swim  as far as the Lower River Region and are often seen at East of  the wetland of Tanbi. They are as well  known to enter tributary in Kiang West National Park and Niumi, the North Bank region.

Both species of the dolphins found in the Gambia can sometimes be sighted a top the deck of the Banjul Barry ferry during crossing.

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Tourism that is eco-friendly and entails people touring virgin and delicate places that are normally secured is called Ecotourism. This type of tourism is aimed at being on small scale as well as creating low environmental impact.

The accommodations for the tourists are established in a way that they fit-in well with the natural world, with the food being domestically acquired and the garbage normally handled on the site. The visitors pay high costs because the tourist numbers allowed on such facilities is low to reduce on any environmental disturbances.

Sustainability is the core perception of ecotourism in order to allow the next generations to enjoy the unique beautiful sights that have been rather unaffected by human beings.

As a sector/industry, Ecotourism is rapidly growing into a significant sector for various countries that are developing by being a source of foreign income as well as conserving part of the delicate environment simultaneously. This concept could be accomplished if a number of countries conserve their tropical forests considering the fact that eco-tourists spend money to come view the natural attractions of the country and not the ruins made as a result of misusing natural resources.

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Mangroves provide ideal breeding grounds for much of the world's fish, shrimp, crabs, and other shellfish. Many fish species, such as barracuda, tarpon, and snook, find shelter among the mangrove roots as juveniles, head out to forage in the seagrass beds as they grow, and move into the open ocean as adults. An estimated 75 percent of commercially caught fish spend some time in the mangroves or depend on food webs that can be traced back to these coastal forests.

They also provide habitat for thousands of species at all levels of marine and forest food webs, from bacteria to barnacles to Bengal tigers. The trees birds also take cover in the dense branches, making it ideal spots for birding. These coastal forests are prime nesting and resting sites for hundreds of shorebirds and migratory bird species, including kingfishers, herons, and egrets. Crab-eating macaque monkeys, fishing cats, and giant monitor lizards hunt among the mangroves, along with endangered species such as olive Ridley turtles, white breasted sea eagles, tree climbing fish, proboscis monkeys, and dugongs. And the soft soil beneath mangrove roots enables burrowing species such as snails and clams to lie in wait. Other species, such as crabs and shrimp, forage in the fertile mud.

The tons of leaves that fall from each acre of mangrove forest every year are the basis of an incredibly productive food web. As the leaves decay, they provide nutrients for invertebrates and algae. These in turn feed many small organisms, such as birds, sponges, worms, anemones, jellyfish, shrimp, and young fishes. Tides also circulate nutrients among mudflats, estuaries, and coral reefs, thus feeding species like oysters that rest on the seabed. Theyprotect both the saltwater and the freshwater ecosystems they straddle. The mangroves' complex root systems filter nitrates and phosphates that rivers and streams carry to the sea. They also keep seawater from encroaching on inland waterways. The roots collect the silt and sediment that tides carry in and rivers carry out towards the sea. By holding the soil in place, the trees stabilize shorelines against erosion. Seedlings that take root on sandbars help stabilize the sandbars over time and may eventually create small islands.

The thickets of mangroves that buttress tidal mudflats also provide a buffer zone that protects the land from wind and wave damage. Places where mangroves have been cut down for shrimp farms are far more vulnerable to destructive cyclones and tidal waves.hTese forests provide many of the resources upon which coastal people depend for their survival and livelihood. At low tide, people can walk across the tidal flats to collect clams, shellfish, and shrimp. At high tide, fish move in to feed among the protection of mangrove roots, turning the marshy land into rich fishing grounds. The mangrove trees themselves provide fuel, medicines, tannins, and wood for building houses and boats . Visit sine-saloum and enjoy nature's beauty.

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Paesaggio savana con termitai in Guinea Bissau

Termite mounds are primarily composed of termite saliva, feces and clay. Termites carefully construct mounds that are composed of a series of tunnels for air flow and also traveling when they are foraging for food.
The walls are very porous, hence facilitating air flow.

A single termite can  barely be  bigger than the moon of a fingernail, its semi-transparent exoskeleton as vulnerable to sunlight as to being crushed by a child in flip-flops. But in groups of a million or two, termites are formidable architects, building mounds that can reach 17 feet (5 meters) and higher. The 33 pounds (15 kilograms) or so of termites in a typical mound will, in an average year, move a fourth of a metric ton (about 550 pounds) of soil and several tons of water. Termites can be found in most part of the world except on Antarctica.

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The vegetation of the river Gambia and its creeks provides a favourable habitat for  animals, and birds. The river abounds in fish and river creatures, including the hippopotamus and the crocodile. Among the 500 bird species that have been recorded are the kingfisher, the cuckoo, the swallow, the heron, the sunbird, the hawk, and the grass warbler.
The swampy region closest to the river, with its dense masses of mangrove trees often growing more than 100 feet (30 m) high, abounds in wildlife but has been of little use for either agriculture or human settlement. The grass-covered river flats  of the lower river are rendered useless for cultivation due to  the salt water that periodically inundates them, and settlements on them are few.
The flats of the middle and upper river are of some agricultural value, however. Much of the grassland is regularly cleared, and the light soils are easily cultivable. The annual flooding of the fertile alluvial loams of the middle flats makes them especially suitable for intensive rice cultivation. On the light sandy and well-drained soils of the higher slopes, peanuts (groundnuts) grow particularly well. Cultivation and settlement have therefore taken place in the middle flats and on the higher slopes, with many villages being located on the borderline between the flats and the plateau, thus avoiding both the flooding of the lower slopes and the increasing aridity of the higher terrain. The river Gambia originated from the FUTA djallon high land in Guinea Conakry through Senegal.

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More peaceful and more tolerant.

 It helps promote tolerance between people as they learn and better understand each other’s cultures.

Preserving heritage.

Tourism can help protect and finance the preservation of historic and cultural sites, and even prompt the creation of new community initiatives.

Preserving the wildlife we love.

Tourism can help protect and revitalise wildlife through preservation programmes against illegal poaching and creates conservation jobs.

Fuelling the adoption of sustainable tech.

Tourism helps accelerate the integration of innovative technologies, which can facilitate your everyday activities while enhancing sustainability and creating more touchless experiences.

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Spending time and energy finding and observing birds is great for your physical, mental, and emotional health. Sure, you’ll be in great shape if you are literally running around chasing birds, but you don’t have to be that intense to get the health benefits of birding.
Looking for birds gets you outside in the fresh air and gets you moving. Even just pottering around at an easy pace is far better for your health than watching Netflix on your couch or sitting at a desk for hours.
You might even end up hiking to somewhat remote areas or at least walking for miles to find interesting birds. Some of the most rewarding birding experiences are those that you work the hardest for.
By becoming a birdwatcher, you are stimulating your brain in healthy ways. You must hone your senses and learn to observe little details. You’ll come to remember the names and habitats of many species. All of this gets keeps your neurons firing and helps form new neural connections in your brain. Birding is perfect for those of us who are lifelong learners.
Your emotional well-being can benefit from birdwatching as well. Birding can be a very fun social activity (see below), but even if you do it alone, you can gain happiness from the gradual accumulation of experiences, knowledge, and species on your ‘Life List’ (should you choose to keep one). Research has shown that cumulative activities like birding can bring us a lot of satisfaction and pleasure.

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